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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
is a healthy and urbanization, but we did have a deficit. one of the challenges to address was to know longer have a deficit. it created an entity that would enable a structure that would enable one to receive money, and those who gave money to get tax deductions was key. so we got a new irs status, c3 charitable foundation, and we also received chi museum.s the nogu prior to that, the noguchi foundation which was the museum was a program of. >> how would you describe the work of noguchi to those are not familiar with this culture or art? york, mother was from new his father was japanese. he called himself a global artist at the time. it was before the motions of multiculturalism and biracial. he was born in 1904. he was extraordinarily prolific in that he worked in parks, landscapes. he was a precursor to all of the artists that went on to be known as earthwork artists. he did parks, playgrounds, theater curtains, theater sets. he had an association with martha graham for 50 years. many people do not realize the big stainless steel piece in rockefeller center, which is in the building, he di
great district 11 really is. >> we are in our fifth year of major budget deficits. it is inevitable that we will make painful cuts. so how do we do it in a way that will minimize the impact on every day san franciscans? >> i really appreciate what you're doing here. you are a really patient gentleman, and i appreciate that. >> our parks are often cut first. how do we maintain our safety net, public health services, security services? all of these are critical decisions that have to be made. >> i have seen many people come forward today who i know whose lives have changed because of the services we are providing. that is something that we can be proud of and have a as a goal at the budget process to make sure that we can turn lives around and create a liveable communities. >> if we do not resolve the pension issue, we will have to cut. we will see fewer options for muni. we will see the parks deteriorate. i think the tide is rising. we have to figure out how to swim very quickly. when you have a drug or alcohol problem, your whole world stops making sense. you can get help for yourse
and discretionary spending and that would be offset so that it doesn't add to the deficit by some revenue increases, though not taxes and some entitlement cuts, though in the medicare and social security. it's a modest deal but lawmakers hope they can announce it by the end of the week, enact it next week and avoid a government shutdown in january. >> who are winners and losers to the extent we know what stays and goes and maybe more pointly, what does this mean for those looming deadlines the government shutdown number which was i think middle of january and then the debt ceiling debate, which resurfaces then again, i think, right around the super bowl? >> tyler, it means both that the debt ceiling increase and the government funding are likely to occur as scheduled, avoid a crisis like we had. lawmakers don't have much appetite for that, especially going into an election year. so in that sense, it's good news for the entire country. in terms of losers, the kinds of fees they are talking about and again, we don't have a final deal are things like higher airline ticket fees, the president had those
about that next in the next segment. . >> a relentlessly growing deficit of opportunity is a bigger threat to our future than our rapidly shrinking fiscal deficit. >> the president on wednesday speaking at the center for american progress. he talked about invoking the fast food workers, liberal economists writing in the new york times responded by writing finally our political class has spent years obsessed which a fake problem worrying about debt and deficits that never pose a threat to the nation's future, showing no interest in stag nateing wages. mr. obama i'm sorry to say bought into that diversion. now, however, he is moving on. isaac, do you share that reading that paul had, two, three years ago, everybody in washington was old souls on a deficit reduction including the president, himself, now even president obama is showing publicly an inclination to show that warren style populism. >> i think the rhetoric has changed. just to go back to the last seg him, jonathan was saying the tea party has people in washington. there is elizabeth warren. i think if it's going to come, it'
flow deficit. we get 10,000 beneficiaries every day and the absence of general reform that allow people to get the care that they need and deserve and abby slover cost growth it will fall under its own financial weight. >> for the secretary to affirm, $500 billion that isn't really chump change in the big picture of health care costs. i am getting comments from constituents in the district who medicare advantage folks now their benefits are being reduced. they are losing access to their preferred physicians. this is under the current system now. my question is how much worse can this get for my seniors who opt out for medicare advantage? again if the strategy for controlling costs is a traditional one of just cutting the provider members and whether its doctors, hospitals, it will backfire. that approach without reform that gives you the prevention and coordination and the better care congress ends up having to put the money back in because you haven't solved the problem. to not put the money back and is tonight bullies i -- deny seniors care. >> to have access to dialysis and the like
point that out. host: yet the deficit is a problem. k stone.this from mar guest: i think tax expenditures is a big problem. there are tax revenues that we should be taking in which we are not because we are subsidizing a significant amount of what some have termed corporate welfare. billions of dollars to the oil and gas industry, they are making record profits. the tax expenditures are costing the american people in ways that are problematic. host: what would you cut the besides defense? guest: revenues that we have lost that would otherwise should take in. other than defense, there is waste and inefficiencies in a wide range of domestic spending programs. i am willing to take a look at almost everything. i think the demonization of social security and medicaid are inappropriate. they are not responsible for the deficit problem we have right now. ronald reagan in a debate with walter mondo and clear social security has nothing to do with the deficit. it was true then and it is true now. att in plano, texas. caller: thank you for taking my call. food stamps is not one of the
,000. >> so deficit or not or maybe especially if we have a national deficit. spending money on pell grants is red investment for our taxpayers. >> yeah. i was going correct you and say it's not spending. it's investment. you are correct. thank you. i appreciate the opportunity. the porps of moving as a nation away from a philosophy toward higher education i've lived importance of the degree. but of course the world has changed a lot in the last 40 years. i would say the federal financial aid system is one of the great success story in the history of the federal government. when our goal was access, we have provided access to higher education for people in the country. like never seen before. in a degree that us value. the income won't be higher. people are graduating with disagrees that make their income no higher. we now have to move from a system that provide access alone to one that incents success so making people's lives better. of course, while it's happening. costs have gone up too. people are now leaving if they don't get a degree most often would too argue they're literally worse
the government, folks with the national deficit dropping at its fastest rate in 60 years? it is time to stop the obsession with deficits and start an obsession about middle-class job creation. >> well, governor granholm, i'm going to give the president credit for these numbers -- >> stop the presses -- >> but this nation is still woefully unemployed. he has to take credit for that, too. i know his numbers could not have come at a better time for an administration that's had a rough couple months. in the crossfire tonight, a pair of economic experts, david madlin director of the american worker project for the center of political progress. >> and david, let me start with you. even though this morning's jobs numbers sound rea
if the challenge is successful, deficit spending could be reduced by $700 billion in the next decade he's here to explain it. oklahoma attorney general, scott pruitt. mr. attorney general, can you breakdown the law for us? >> good evening, sean. one of the things have you to recognize when congress pass add fordable care act, they recognized importance of the states in rolling out exchanges we see y they've not done a good job of it and knew they cannot commandeer or require the state to impose changes. the subsidy goes you through health care exchanges. 34 states came in and said no, irs said we'll fix that and says subsidies with exchanges. so our lawsuit is making sure the letter of the law is complied with >> but the law didn't say. that the law, in other words gave you the option, did it not? didn't say there would be penalties? >> right if there is no state health care insurance exchanges there are no subsidies. if there are no subsidies there are no penalties now, irs saying we're going assess the penalties whether state exchanges have been set up or not they're doing what they do often
-- if you want to keep a deficit the way it is, you need to find some way to save money elsewhere if you're going to boost spending for the next two years which is what they're talking about. they're talking about cutting spending over a longer time frame in other areas. one area they might ask federal employees to pay a little more for their pension plans. another possible rumored area is they might hike the fees for airline security. now we don't know the exact details of these, and in some ways that's actually a good sign. the fact that a lot of these proposals aren't really leaking in their specifics means that the talks are still ongoing and that they're still productive and you know, a couple of people have said, once you start hearing these damaging leaks about oh, this isn't it or democrats are proposing this that's when things are falling apart. >> brad let me ask you, what are the chances of this deal as it's taking shape now passing both chambers, i'm particularly talking about the house, if you talk about fees that's easily construed as a tax. >> the house is a tricky part. t
a quick list. the adp private jobs boomed. 215,000. the trade deficit narrowed. new home sales were gangbusters. the ism services, little soft but still pretty good in the mid 50s. the fed beige book, pretty darn good. i'm not counting today's little -- this little three or four day thing, it's not a real question. why isn't good news good news? you look at these numbers and you could say to yourself, the economy is getting better. >> yeah, i think that in the end will be good news for the market, larry. in the meantime i think the market's saying, okay, if the news is good, maybe the fed tapers sooner rather than later. i'm not sure i like that so much. that's one explanation. i think another is, hey wait a minute, we're up a double digit percentage. we're up a lot in a short amount of time. we're discounting some good news. i'm tired. i'm going to take a rest. i think that's a bit what's going on here. >> protect your gains, that's what you're saying. >> here here. >> let me ask you this. okay. so you're janet yellen. you're going to be janet yellen tonight. you're coming in. i kn
together solutions to fill in the gaps financially even at a little deficit reduction on top of that, things like raising the fees for airline companies pay for for airport security, that's on the revenue side and on the spending side, curbing federal retirement which some lawmakers don't like but it's a way to get some money. >> jon, thanks for the update. appreciate it very much. john harwood. ty, up to you. >> herbal life may be turning the tables on the hedge fund titan bill ackman. plus, this brings new meaning to the term ski out. how the middle class are getting squeezed out of the slopes this season. the power rundown is next. we'll tell you all about it. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 searching for trade ideas that spark your curiosity tdd# 1-800-345-2550 can take you in many directions. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 you read this. watch that. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 you look for what's next. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 at schwab, we can help turn inspiration into action tdd# 1-800-345-2550 boost your trading iq with the help of tdd# 1-800-345-2550 our live online workshops tdd# 1-800-345-2550 like identify
deficit representing 17% of total revenue and, therefore, having to go in a different direction when a lot of states were simply saying we're going to cut, cut, cut, actually realizing our gap was too big, it add to be a combination of the two, i went out on road, and i got beat up. but somebody had to explain what we were trying to do. and when it came to education, i did that as well. and there were a lot of people mad at me and, you know, folks spending a lot of money to try to defeat an organized effort at school reform even though they supported certain aspects of it, you know? it was the total picture that they didn't want to see happen. they might carve out a corner that they liked, but it was the total picture. somebody has to be the leader, somebody has to have the discussion, somebody has to bring the discussion to the communities, and somebody has to demonstrate to members of the legislature that, you know, you mean business, and you want to work with them, you want their input be, but you need to change direction. and i'll go back to this, you know, hartford be, new haven, brid
spent on the traditional program. particularly when there's so much concerned with the deficit and debt. medicare is historically -- payments below or equal to what medicare would expect to be in the traditional program for beneficiaries who enroll in the plan. this changed in 2003, and by 2009, payments were considerably higher than medicare would've paid for the same beneficiaries if they were in the traditional program. this cause every beneficiary more in added part b premiums and provide a little incentives for m.a. plans to become more efficient. when i examined the 2009 plan data i found wide variation in m.a. plans cost relative to traditional medicare spending, even controlling for plan levels, plan types and payment levels. that suggest there was room for a lot more efficiency in the program, variable across plants. and the policy changes that were in the aca reflect recommendations that congress is on medicare payment advisory commission has advocated for years. third, many of the concerns raised about 2014 offerings either to my mind from what i've looked at are not consiste
. particularly when there is so much concern with the deficit and debt. medicare is historically aimed to set a men's to ma plans equal to what medicare would expect to pay in a traditional program. bys changed in 2003, and 2009 came into a considerably higher that medicare would have paid for the same beneficiaries if they were in the same program. this cost every beneficiary more and added part b damien's, providing little incentives to become more efficient. . found wide variations that suggests there was room for a lot more efficiency in the program. were incy changes that the aca reflect recommendations that congress'own commission has advocated for years. raised the concerns offerings to my mind are not consistent with the evidence on her part the way competitive markets work. the already addressed protections and places in the program. only five percent of beneficiaries in 2014 will have to shift plans. most will be able to stay in the same type of land. 21%average premium was down for a beneficiary, and premiums stable in 2014. some beneficiaries will see premiums rise in 2000 14. th
, loss of bladder continents, and the deficits of treatment are currently outweighing the benefits. so that test is no longer recommended. the numbers are pretty clear that the overdiagnosed of early breast cancer happens in many cases as well, and there are a number of things that are being thertaken to try to improve situation clinically. from the point of view the national cancer institute, the thing we are trying to solve is the question of how we can take these early abnormalities and tests to kinds of distinguish between those that are likely to evolve into life- threatening illnesses and those beniare simply the nine -- gn abnormalities that would not cause serious symptoms or life- threatening situations had they not been detected. we're talking with leading researchers about their areas of expertise at the nih. dr. harold varmus is the director of the national cancer institutes. al is joining us from cambridge, ohio. caller: good morning. it is a pleasure to be able to talk to a doctor out here after working for 40 years at a good job but cannot seem to ever get to talk to a d
, on the economy, on health care, on the deficit. that's very specific and has an impact on next year's elections. >> tonight, chris will afford us all the opportunity to watch the president of the united states. >> "hardball" is kicking you know what? it's kicking it old school, man. remember we used to watch "who wants to be a millionaire" and regis had to be on every night. chris was on at 2:00 and 3:00, 12 times a day. he's on 7:00 now. boom. the number one show. >> more popular than peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. >> you embarrass me, joe. >> not so easily embarrassed, chris. i assure our audience. >> i think it's interesting, joe. you ask the greatest question tonight. you know the business. i don't usually need them. i enjoy just duking it out with politicians at a distance. i don't need to beg them to come on my show. i always thought, i see the president pop up on different kind of show, entertainment shows like letterman and leno and i'm thinking why can't we get them. they made some decisions in the white house and may have to do with these numbers you guys are talking about. the p
trillions of dollars of additional deficit and debt are good things for her. >> reporter: and our thanks to dana bash for that, reporting on the gop trying to woo more women voters. >>> all right. the fbi believes a letter was written and sent by a missing new hampshire teenager, abigail hernandez. she was last seen in october on her way home from school in the town of conway. well, abigail's mother received a letter a month ago. police won't talk about details in the letter, but say they are concerned for abigail's safety. adding that it is possible that she is being held against her will. >>> and while you were sleeping, u.s. defense secretary chuck hagel was on a military transport headed for an unannounced trip to afghanistan. he landed in kabul earlier this morning. is he there to thank the u.s. troops for their service and training afghan training forces, and he'll meet with his afghan counterpart to see if afghan troops are able to defend their own country. >>> as the world mourns the death of nelson mandela, tributes to south africa's first black president are pouring in that cou
't want to -- hold on, says the talk about. let's make up the deficit. and he begins to haul out yeller boys out of his pocket. it's a most amazing good idea, duke. you have got a clever head on you, says the king. blessed if you ain't helping us out again, and he begun to haul out yeller jackets and stack them out. they made up the 6,000 clean and clear. says, say the -- say, says the duke, let's count this money and then take and give it to the girls. good land, duke. let me hug you, it's the most dazzling idea ever a hand struck. you certainly got the most astonishing head i ever seen. oh, this is the boss dodge. there ain't no mistake about it. let 'em fetch along their suspicions now if they want to. this'll lay 'em out. i don't know where i am, but i'm pretty close to ten. but as you might expect, they get -- [inaudible] because the two real heirs show up. [laughter] [applause] so anyways, thank you. >> it's really nice to see how bad guys get their comeuppance, at least in fiction if not always in real life. our next reader is peter -- [inaudible] peter is a poet and a volunteer
, finding a little bit of deficit reduction. here's the key thing to focus on, though, right now, alex. the tone. there doesn't seem to be an appetite for another government shutdown. that, of course, bodes well for the economy and washington in general. take a listen to what two lawmakers had to say earlier today. >> keep the budget caps in place, not raise taxes, which is important during this weak economy, and actually avoid a government shutdown. so i'm hopeful that even by the end of this week we'll be able to come together and achieve that. >> i certainly hope as part of it that the negotiators will take to heart what the president had to say. there are working families across america that are struggling. there are unemployed families who need a helping hand. we've got to protect and preserve the safety net in america and give these working families a fighting chance. >> so alex, of course there you have republican rob portman, democrat dick durbin. and you heard senator durbin talking about unemployment insurance. that is still the main sticking point. democrats, the president w
taxes, sales tax. we have all budget surplus, i walked in with a budget deficit, i now have a $1.2 billion surplus. we're making our economy the opportunity economy where, you know, if you want to build a business, you can -- and you want to get a job, you come to florida. >> your unemployment rate has dropped quicker than any other state, i know that. and you're now -- >> 6.7 -- >> which is below, we got down to -- >> 7%. >> i don't know, yeah. anyway, you're at 6.7%, were you higher? i would think you'd always be below. >> unemployment went from 3.5% to 11.1%. >> where was the national average? >> 9%. >> never got above -- >> i think it was nine when i came -- >> maybe ten. >> i think it was nine when i came in. in the month of october, we generated private sector jobs, my good friend governor perry, only had 12,000 jobs. >> oh, you two guys go at each other. i see that a lot. that's a great rivalry. almost like a football -- >> he was number one. what do you want to be? i want to be number one. so i go after number one. >> what's the minimum wage? >> it's $7.67. >> is that a w
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)